How Lawrence Bender Put “Pulp Fiction” To The Big Screen

IN the world of Hollywood, the directors and the movie stars seem to get all the attention. However, one producer is known for bringing the vision of many top directors to the big screen. That producer, Lawrence Bender, has been bringing big name movies to the big screen, including a half-dozen from his longtime collaborator Quentin Tarantino.

While you may not be familiar with the name Lawrence Bender, you already know about the hip, crime writer-director Quentin Tarantino. Together, the two have created some of the most popular films of the 1990s and the 2000s. But there is perhaps no film more famous or infamous than the duo’s second collaboration, “Pulp Fiction.”

Mr. Bender met Mr. Tarantino at a mutual friend’s barbecue in 1990. At the time, both of them were struggling to make a name for themselves in Hollywood. As a producer with a couple of B-movie credits to his name, Mr. Bender had a little more juice in Hollywood than Mr. Tarantino. So when the young Tarantino pitched the young producer for a movie about a heist gone wrong, Mr. Bender pulled together his limited contacts to get the film made.

The result was “Reservoir Dogs,” which is considered one of the most impressive debuts of any rookie director. The success of the first film allowed the two to create the follow-up film, “Pulp Fiction.” Considered by some to be the greatest crime film ever producer, the film went on to gross over $100 million dollars and earn Lawrence Bender an Academy Award nomination for Best Picture.

While many give Quentin Tarantino all the credit for “Pulp Fiction,” the film would not have come together if it weren’t for the hard work of Lawrence Bender. Mr. Bender was tasked with just an $8 million dollar budget to help put together a sprawling crime epic which intertwined three stories and featured a star-powered cast which included John Travolta, Samuel Jackson, Uma Thurman and Bruce Willis.

Born in the Bronx, Lawrence Bender has been producing films for three decades. Among some of the biggest films to Mr. Bender’s credit include, “Pulp Fiction,” “Inglourious Basterds,” and “Good Will Hunting.” Today, Lawrence Bender is considered one of the legendary producers whose films perform well in the box office as well as the award shows.

http://jewishjournal.com/culture/arts/71907/

The Best Found Footage Movies And The One That Started It All

 

Real die hard fans of the horror movie genre know that the first, and maybe the most terrifying found footage movie was the 1980 movie, Cannibal Holocaust, controversial at the time after rumors swirled that the footage was not fake. As with a lot of the best movies of all time, some thought the footage and story were very much real. The director, Ruggero Deodato, was arrested on obscenity charges because of the extremely graphic scenarios depicted in the movie.

 

The extremely successful Paranormal Activity was what really injected new life into the genre. A host of other found footage movies followed, notable titles include Cloverfield, V/H/S, and Quarantine, most of which were moderately successful. Horror has seemed to be the go to approach for the majority.

 

One of the most outstanding that comes to anyone’s mind when you think of non-horror found footage is Project X. Project X takes the viewer through a day in the life of three high school losers just trying to be cool, get the girl, and break all the rules. They achieve their goals in spades when they throw what grows into the greatest party anyone this side of the Pacific has ever seen.

 

It seems that each year they manage to engage audiences across the globe, thinking of more exciting, unbelievable ways to add a new kind of twist.  Although, even though they are horror movies, they could still use catchy movie theme songs here and there.